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Amending the Cannabis Act – Cannabis News, Lifestyle

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Amending the Cannabis Act? The Canadian government says they will review and amend it as soon as possible. But the deadline to begin the review is eight months passed. Scheduled for October 2021, Health Canada won’t comment on when the review will occur, only that any amending will come from a “credible, evidence-driven process.”

Health Canada also said the review could take up to 18 months. The latest federal budget promised a cannabis industry roundtable, but no details have been released. However, some remain skeptical that meetings between government bureaucrats and industry insiders will do anything except help out the larger producers at the expense of the smaller craft companies.

Forward Regulatory Plan

Amending the Cannabis Act

But will a review and amendment of the Cannabis Act work out in everyone’s favour? So far, the federal government plans to update the Cannabis Act through some regulatory changes that Health Canada will be taking the lead on.

These regulatory changes include:

  • Cutting back on regulatory paperwork “to simplify and reduce requirements related to record keeping, reporting and notifications, and to provide more flexibility in meeting certain requirements related to matters such as antimicrobial treatment.”
  • Amending the regulations to “facilitate cannabis research for non-therapeutic purposes.”
  • Increasing the possession limit for cannabis beverages (no indication of raising the THC limit or abandoning it altogether).
  • Allowing the sale of certain health products containing cannabis without a prescription
  • Amending Cannabis Act regulations to “restrict the production, sale, promotion, packaging, or labelling of inhaled cannabis extracts with certain flavors, other than the flavor of cannabis.”

Health Canada says these changes are unlikely to be ready until the end of the year.

Buying cannabis health products without a prescription is a step in the right direction. But the typical attitude of Health Canada bureaucrats is that public health and safety trump your personal autonomy. So the agency will now be targeting cannabis producers promoting terpene profiles that they’ve decided are not “flavors of cannabis.”

Why Bother Amending the Cannabis Act?

Why bother amending the Cannabis Act when the government should scrap it altogether? The entire Liberal Legalization scheme has insulted the Western legal tradition of free markets and the rule of law. 

All they needed to do was remove cannabis from the Criminal Code. We already have laws on the books that facilitate peaceful associations. Tort and criminal law provide security, while contract, property, and commercial law facilitate cooperation and exchange. Politics doesn’t need to enter the picture. Politicians certainly don’t need to draft new legislation and create roles for their already inflated taxpayer-funded bureaucracy.

The three major hurdles for small craft producers are:

  1. Barriers to entry because of the high costs of bureaucracy
  2. Arbitrary rules on some products, such as THC limits on edibles and capsules
  3. How the LPs can tap equity markets and starve out their competition who are malnourished because,
  4. Excise taxes ensure Canada won’t ever have a middle-class of cannabis producers.

Will an industry roundtable consisting of large producers and government bureaucrats solve these issues? Or will they only address the excise tax since even the larger producers send half their revenue to Ottawa?

Time will tell, but LPs and bureaucrats seem to think the roundtable will be a cure-all.

I have my doubts. If you want some insight into what this “cannabis industry table” is going to be about, look at who supports it. If you want some insight into what amending the Cannabis Act will look like, take a gander at everything else this government has (or hasn’t) done.

A true, small L, classical liberal cannabis market won’t occur until Justin’s Liberals are out of power.





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How Pierre Poilievre Will Ban Cannabis – Weed | Cannabis | Marijuana

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Could future Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Poilievre ban cannabis without any parliamentary debate?

When governments worldwide overreacted to the coronavirus, Canadians smoked record amounts of weed. It’s only natural that when placed under house arrest and fed propaganda about the end of the world, people felt the need to smoke away the stress.

But so what? Cannabis is a harmless plant. It is non-lethal and non-toxic. It will not poison you or leave you “addicted.”

Yet, public health busybodies don’t believe this.

These are the same fascists that called (or continue to call) for lockdowns and vaccine mandates. These people believe their “expert opinion” overrides our legal system and the rule of law.

They think “cannabis use disorder” inflicts people like a disease. That its medical value is overstated and its harms are underappreciated.

So all Poilievre has to do is say he’s “listening to the experts,” and voilà!

Prohibited cannabis and without parliamentary debate. That is how Pierre Poilievre will ban cannabis.

Will Pierre Poilievre Ban Cannabis? 

How Pierre Poilievre Will Ban Cannabis

When British Columbia decriminalized opioids, cocaine, methamphetamine, and MDMA this past June, Pierre Poilievre tweeted negatively.

“Decriminalizing deadly drug use is the opposite of compassionate. Those struggling with addiction need treatment & recovery. Drug dealers need strong policing & tough sentences.”

Of course, Poilievre is right for all the wrong reasons.

If we accept the decrees of public health when there’s a flu pandemic, why not trust their expertise with drug use?

Instead of decriminalizing drugs, B.C. police could arrest users and throw them into psychiatric wards against their will. Take their phones and cut them off from the outside world. That’s what addiction treatment and recovery are all about, after all.

And then, I think we can all agree that your local fentanyl dealer deserves the death penalty.

As for cannabis? It’s unlikely the Conservatives will repeal the Cannabis Act any more than they repealed same-sex marriage laws.

But, as I said, Poilievre doesn’t need parliamentary approval. 

Power is getting concentrated in the hands of the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO). And at the expense of the House of Commons and the Cabinet.

This trend didn’t begin under Justin Trudeau. Still, he certainly accelerated it just as Stephen Harper accelerated the trend from the Liberal government before him.

There’s no reason to think Poilievre would give up this kind of power.

Seriously, Will Pierre Poilievre Ban Cannabis? 

How Pierre Poilievre Will Ban Cannabis

No, probably not. 

But what if Poilievre wants to remove cannabis from Canada like Justin Trudeau is disarming the public? 

In that case, Poilievre doesn’t need anyone’s approval except his own. Trudeau is making firearms illegal through an Order-in-Council

In theory, the entire Cabinet drafts an Order-in-Council. The governor-general then approves it. In most cases, orders-in-council are notices of federal appointments or regulations. 

They are not meant to replace the legislative process. But that is what Justin Trudeau is doing. He is using an order-in-council the way U.S. Presidents use an Executive Order.

Even if you support Justin’s strict, state-enforced gun control, you should disagree with how he’s doing it. 

For if he can introduce new sweeping laws through an order-in-council, there’s nothing to stop a Conservative government from using the same process to re-prohibit cannabis. 

Pierre Poilievre Ban Cannabis? Here’s What He’ll Do Instead

Nothing.

Canada’s legalization review is long overdue. I don’t expect a Poilievre government to push for reform unless it turns out legalization is costing taxpayers billions more in regulatory oversight than alcohol or tobacco.

In that case, Poilievre may want to seek Ontario Conservative Premier Doug Ford’s advice. When once asked about the proliferation of cannabis shops, he said, “It doesn’t matter if it’s cannabis or another type of the store, the market will take care of it.”

That is the correct answer.

What Poilievre Should Be Doing

How Pierre Poilievre Will Ban Cannabis

Poilievre is talking about removing gatekeepers so Canadians can build more homes and live in them. 

Instead of a hypothetical where Pierre Poilievre bans cannabis, what about one where he improves the industry by gutting taxes and regulations? 

Cannabis biomass is the responsibility of Ottawa. Poilievre can repeal the Cannabis Act and replace it with legislation that treats cannabis as the agricultural commodity that it is.

Using hemp in construction is not a fringe idea. While it has drawbacks (like not being suitable as a load-bearing material), hemp is an excellent insulator and absorbs carbon. Hempcrete handles moisture well, reduces the possibility of mould and promotes good indoor air quality.

Cannabis can also make bioethanol, a petrol substitute from fermented stalks. Hemp biodiesel, which works for diesel engines, is produced using the plant’s oil. Less toxic than table salt, hemp can run on an unmodified diesel engine and burns clean enough to pass federal regulations.

Will Poilievre do these things? Unlikely, but considering he’s already considered a fringe radical by the corporate press, what does he have to lose? 

Poilievre says Wilfred Laurier is one of his favourite prime ministers. Laurier once said, “Canada is free, and freedom is its nationality.”

Suppose Poilievre wants a spot in history books next to Laurier. In that case, he can transform the Canadian economy from petroleum-based to cannabis-based. 

He’d go down as a pioneer—a founding father of the new green economy. And not the fake-green propaganda we hear from the World Economic Forum and other globalist organizations.

I mean, real, natural environmental conservation. 

Policies that don’t sacrifice our liberty or standard of living. Policies that recognize pollution for what it is: private property violations. 





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Canada’s Medical Cannabis Reimbursements – Weed | Cannabis | Marijuana

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A record number of Canadian military veterans have received medical cannabis reimbursements. The federal government spent more than $150 million last fiscal year. The amount has doubled from only three years ago.

Veterans Affairs Canada is on track to spend $200 million on medical cannabis reimbursements this year.

Medical Cannabis Reimbursements for Vets

The rationale behind the reimbursements is the 2008 court decision requiring the federal government to provide “reasonable access” to medical cannabis. And it makes sense when the federal government already reimburses vets for pharmaceuticals.

The demand among veterans has soared since 2016. In November, the government overhauled how it dealt with medical cannabis reimbursements. The government reduced the amount of cannabis it would cover as a reimbursement, as well as the cost.

So-called “experts” applauded the decision, as they equate an absence of evidence as evidence of absence. Some believe military veterans are abusing cannabis to avoid their psychological trauma. But this is just further evidence of the cannabis industry‘s public health problem.

Can Canadians Afford This? 

Medical Cannabis Reimbursements

The November 2016 overhaul slashed medical cannabis reimbursements to three grams per day from the previous ten. The government gave those using more than three grams six months to either wean themselves down or find an additional means of income to afford their medicine.

Slashing medical cannabis reimbursements for vets came in the wake of an auditor general report. Citing “public health experts,” they decided that ten grams per day were too much.

Some can’t imagine putting a price on treating Canada’s vets with dignity. But the fact is that the year-over-year increase in medical cannabis reimbursements is unsustainable in the long term.

Should Vets Get Medical Cannabis Reimbursements?

Should Canada’s military veterans receive medical cannabis reimbursements? Most Canadians would likely argue yes. Whatever the annual cost, national defence is the federal government’s top priority (or, at least, it should be). And if that means combat vets need ten grams of medical cannabis per day for the rest of their lives – so be it.

If the federal government wants to reduce these costs, there are several ways to do it.

One:  Suppose the federal government wants the number of vets with PTSD and requiring medical cannabis reimbursements to go down. In that case, they can stop requiring our military to engage in activities that cause trauma.

They can stop sending Canada’s military to parts of the world where we have no business. “Peacekeeping” missions in Yugoslavia or Rwanda are an Orwellian way of describing war.

Two: They can defund other areas of the government. The federal government’s first (and some would argue, only) function is national defence. 

All additional government bureaucracies can be gutted or downsized to the provincial government. Or, ideally, returned to the private sector that handles resource allocation more efficiently and effectively.

Three: They can liberalize the cannabis industry, resulting in lower prices. Lower prices for the same or higher amounts of cannabis mean the cost of medical cannabis reimbursements goes down, even as usage or the number of vets increases.

In Summary

Canada's Medical Cannabis Reimbursements

A record number of Canadian military veterans receive medical cannabis reimbursements. This number increases year after year. Capping what vets can claim is a short-term solution if one can even call it a solution. “This is purely a cost-saving endeavour,” says Michael Blais, founder of Canadian Veterans Advocacy.

However, the most insulting part of all this is the “public health experts” suggesting that military vets are avoiding their problems or trauma by consuming medical cannabis instead of some toxic pharmaceutical.

The next time the Canadian government wants to engage in a conflict overseas, perhaps we can send politicians and public health busybodies instead. Keep the troops home. Station them in the Arctic. We have a lot of work to do up there. Russia is already claiming parts of the Arctic circle for itself.

We shouldn’t be so foolish as to believe that territory belongs to Canada just because it says so on a map. 





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What are the most active ingredients in hemp and cannabis?

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Delta-9 THC is the most common active ingredient in cannabis. And CBD is the second most common on the market today. But are THC and CBD the first and second most active ingredients in cannabis?

Two cannabis ingredients more active than D9-THC

CBN (cannabinol) and delta-8 THC, byproducts of THC-acid or CBD, lightly agonize CB1 receptors with less activity than delta-9 THC.

Pharmacologists use a binding efficacy measure to deduce a molecule’s activity on a receptor. At CB1 receptors, D9-THC is nearly two times more active than a minor variant of itself known as THCv. Albeit an agonist in small doses, THCv (tetrahydrocannabivarin) is more commonly known as a neutral CB1 receptor antagonist. Neutral antagonism and inverse agonism is still activity, though.

Different types of activity at receptor sites. Courtesy of Coll, A. 2013. (1)

Infamously, a minor ingredient in cannabis chemovars known as THCp is thirty-three times more active than D9. (2) However, hexyl-THC is also present in cannabis with an unknown affinity and efficacy. (3)

THCp is the most potent ingredient in cannabis, with hexyl-THC in second place. Yet, more research needs to confirm hexyl-THC’s affinity at CB1 receptors. Furthermore, THC-oct, also known as THCj, has not yet been seen in cannabis but is more active than THCp given its longer side chain.

The most active ingredient in hemp

CBD partially binds to and agonizes the therapeutic human cannabinoid receptor, CB2. But let’s not forget about one terpene and ingredient in most hemp and cannabis chemovars, b-caryophyllene — a full CB2 receptor agonist. B-caryophyllene does not directly affect CB1 receptors, whereas CBD works as a Negative Allosteric Modulator (NAM) at CB1 receptors. That means CBD changes how THC’s stone feels, reducing part of the CB1 receptor’s spectrum.

Hexyl-CBD is, however, also present in cannabis. (3) With a longer-side chain, hexyl-CBD is more active than its common cousin, according to studies in mice. And a renowned study documented the discovery of CBDp and THCp in chemovars from the Italian government a year earlier — but only tested the latter. (2)

Cannabimimetic activity

At the end of the day, efficacy and affinity at CB1 or CB2 receptors still cannot deduce the ‘activity’ of a cannabinoid. Cannabidiol is broad, affecting a large umbrella of biological mechanisms. The promiscuous cannabinoid, therefore, is often descriptive of CBD.

Then again, it is one of the most thoroughly studied cannabinoids. And more research on CBG (cannabigerol) has come to light in recent years, with CBC (cannabichromene) and other ingredients still in the background.

CBD protects the endocannabinoid known as anandamide, which partially activates the CB1 receptor agonist. Likewise, ibuprofen and chocolate protect anandamide. In contrast, CBG protects 2-AG, an endocannabinoid that functions as a full CB1 and CB2 receptor agonist. Not surprisingly, drugs that protect 2-AG face delays due to their more broad cannabimimetic effect.

Furthermore, CBG and CBGa are both more potent COX-2 inhibitors than CBD, but not necessarily CBDa. The plant produces acidic phytocannabinoids, whereas COX-2 enzymes degrade the endocannabinoids.

What is the second most active ingredient in cannabis?

That question depends on many factors, and researchers can only make estimations at this time.

  • Efficacy at CB Receptors — Hexyl-THC (given THC-oct/THCj does not occur naturally.)
  • Activity at CB1 Receptors respective to abundance in current chemovars — CBN (cannabinol)
  • Activity at CB2 Receptors respective to abundance in current chemovars — Beta-caryophyllene
  • General cannabimimetic — THCa (with full spectrum extract) (4)
  • Most sites affected — CBD

Opining that CBD is the second most active ingredient in cannabis exposes two problems in cannabis science and endocannabinology. Firstly, the quantified answer to photodynamic activity is not straightforward. Secondly, the answer is not known.

Let us know in the comments what you think defines a cannabinoid’s activity level. And check out this story to learn more about hexyl-THC.

Sources

  1. Coll, Anthony. (2013). “Are melanocortin receptors constitutively active in vivo?”. European journal of pharmacology. 719. 10.1016/j.ejphar.2013.04.051.
  2. Citti C, Linciano P, Russo F, et al. A novel phytocannabinoid isolated from Cannabis sativa L. with an in vivo cannabimimetic activity higher than Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol: Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabiphorol. Sci Rep. 2019;9(1):20335. Published 2019 Dec 30. doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56785-1
  3. Linciano P, Citti C, Russo F, et al. Identification of a new cannabidiol n-hexyl homolog in a medicinal cannabis variety with an antinociceptive activity in mice: cannabidihexol. Sci Rep. 2020;10(1):22019. Published 2020 Dec 16. doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79042-2
  4. De Petrocellis L, Ligresti A, Moriello AS, et al. Effects of cannabinoids and cannabinoid-enriched Cannabis extracts on TRP channels and endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes. Br J Pharmacol. 2011;163(7):1479-1494. doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.01166.x





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