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How Popular Are Psychedelics In America? Survey Says ~30% Have Tried

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The psychedelics industry is gearing up for a massive debut, and opinions on the compounds are changing for the better. How popular are psychedelics in America right now? New survey results show that these compounds are not unknown to the American public, and that close to 30% of respondents, have already tried them.

With the psychedelics boom underway, we now ask the question, just how popular are psychedelics in America? A recent survey has some interesting results on this matter. Welcome to out completely independent news publication focusing on cannabis and psychedelics reporting. We offer the Cannadelics Weekly Newsletter to provide regular updates for readers, along with some top notch deals on all kinds of products including smoking paraphernalia, edibles, and cannabinoid compounds like the uber popular Delta 8 THC, and HHC. Head to our ‘best of’ lists to check out offers, and make sure to only purchase the products you are fully comfortable using.


The psychedelics revolution

100 years ago psychedelics weren’t a thing yet, at least not in Western medicine. Though they’ve enjoyed a wide and long-ranging tenure in different cultural traditions, their use as a recreational or medicinal drug in today’s modern, Westernized world, was still far off 100 years ago. 50 Years ago, legislation to get rid of psychedelics from society in general, already went through. Yup, in just a 50 years period, drugs like LSD were discovered, found to have great therapeutic properties, and then were promptly illegalized, both by the US government, and the UN.

What started blossoming out as a beautiful answer to issues of mental health and addiction, was snuffed out in favor of the pharmaceutical antidepressant market, which was never effective, so long as you never listened to pharmaceutical reps, or paid-for research, which is a significantly bigger issue than most people realize. And it happened so fast, that most people never gained awareness of the benefits these compounds provide. In fact, psychedelics existed mainly as a black market for recreational purposes, and were roundly associated with hippies and the anti-war movement of the 1960’s.

So, it’s a major change in climate to go from scare-tactic videos showing people jumping out of windows (part of my DARE program in high school), to news articles blaring about how quickly drugs like magic mushrooms and ketamine help with treatment resistant depression. It’s even more eye-opening that Oregon passed legislation to legalize psilocybin mushrooms, and that Washington, California, Michigan, and Colorado are working toward legalizations as well. And lets certainly not forget that the US government actually did legalize a form of ketamine in 2019 (esketamine) for depression, though in a very quiet manner.

psychedelics mescaline

Beyond treatment resistant depression, psychedelics are being studied in earnest for their ability to help with addiction issues, pain management (particularly ketamine), obsessive-compulsive issues, and post-partum depression. In fact, ketamine is already being openly used for all of the above in a clinic system that allows its prescription, because of its place as an approved anesthetic.

With the line changing from ‘psychedelics are dangerous’ to ‘psychedelics are good for you’, it’s not that surprising that such compounds already have a relatively high use rate in a place like America. How high? Different surveys give different estimates, but one says that psychedelics are already so popular in America, that about 30% of the population has already tried them.

How popular are psychedelics in America Latest survey

How popular are psychedelics in America right now? It’s hard to get concrete answers to questions like this because its hard to survey the entire country. Surveys take representative measurements – where a small portion of the population is questioned to represent a greater population, and they come with a lot of issues, particularly when samples are small, or not collected to reflect a greater population. Having said that, since polling every individual for opinion is not possible in a country the size of the US, surveys are about the best we have to go on.

A recent survey conducted by YouGov, a British internet-based data analytics and market research company, found that almost 30% of Americans already tried psychedelics at least once. Now, this survey has massive limitations. For one, only 1000 people were questioned, and though they were picked to represent the US, they unlikely did in a comprehensive way. It should be expected that this particular group is not representative of the US at large. Even so, when it comes to this topic, there’s not much to go on, so this is what we’ve got.

According to the report, the sample was weighted “According to gender, age, race, and education based on the 2018 American Community Survey, conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau, as well as news interest and 2020 Presidential vote (or non-vote).”

The survey, conducted between July 22-25 of this year, showed that of the seven psychedelics asked about (LSD, magic mushrooms/psilocybin, MDMA/ecstasy, DMT, mescaline/peyote, ketamine, and salvia), 28% of respondents had already tried at least one. Of those drugs, LSD was the most popular psychedelic in America according to this sample, with 14% of respondents having tried it. Second was psilocybin, which 13% had tried. MDMA was third with 9%, ketamine was done by 6%, DMT also by 6%, and salvia by 5%.

Psychedelic mushrooms
Psychedelic mushrooms

Though the survey has plenty of holes, it does show something for sure; that psychedelics are accepted and popular enough for a good chunk of this sample to already be familiar with them. Psychedelics are Schedule I controlled substances, with the exception of ketamine which has Schedule III approval as an anesthetic, and its half-brother esketamine which is also Schedule III for depression. It says a lot about how people see them, and the lessening fear associated with them, that so many in the survey had already done them.

What does other research say?

Obviously, its cool to see the results of the survey mentioned above, because it shows how popular psychedelics are in America, despite years of smear campaigns against them. But, how much can these results be generalized to all of America? Let’s take a look at other research done in the last decade on psychedelic use in the US.

One interesting study, which came out in 2013, called Over 30 million psychedelic users in the United States, looked to establish an “estimated lifetime prevalence of psychedelic use” by using data from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), which sampled 57,873, 12 years and older. The study specifically looked at LSD, magic mushrooms, and mescaline, and found that as of 2010, there were over 30 million people who had used psychedelics in their lives. The greatest use category was for 30–34-year-olds.

In a study like this, whether results are liked or not, it should be remembered that all data is taken from other data sets which were not collected for the specific purposes of this study, and that study investigators had no way to control for confounding factors (a confounding factor is anything that can influence the outcome outside of what is being investigated). In the study, the authors state, “This study was exempt from review by our Regional Committee for Medical Research Ethics because all data are available in the public domain without any identification of personal information.”

Researchers were also specifically estimating, meaning they weren’t taking direct outcome numbers, but using direct outcome numbers to form estimate numbers via the online Survey Documentation Analysis, which comes from the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research. Even with these limitations, being able to estimate that nearly 1/3 of Americans have tried psychedelics, certainly says a lot for their general prevalence.

Let’s look at just LSD now. According to a DrugPolicy report from 2017 using already collected 2014 survey data, in the age group of 12-17 year-olds, .3% of the collected 16,875 respondents were current LSD users. That percentage was also relevant to the group of 18-25 year-olds, for which there were 11,643 data points. In terms of actively using adults aged 26 and above, .1% of the total 33,750 sampled, were active users. Active use in this case means used within the last month. This is different from looking at surveys that establish whether someone has ever done a drug in their lifetime, which helps explain the lower numbers.

Psychedelics acid

Another study also looked at just LSD. This study from ScienceDirect, entitled Trends in LSD use among US adults: 2015–2018, used a secondary analysis of National Survey on Drug Use and Health data from 2015–2018. This involved the use of data from 168,562 adults ages 18 and up, which means this study also only took from previous data compiled for different research projects, in which the investigators could not control for anything.

According to results, use of LSD rose 56.4% between the years of 2015 and 2018. It showed that usage for the age group 26-34years of age increased to 31.1% from 19.6%, and that for the age group 35-49, there was an increase to 8.82% from 2.73%. The oldest age group of 50 years and up also saw an increase in use to 2.66% from 1.83%.

Conclusion

How popular are psychedelics in the US? Popular enough that nearly 30% of a US sample have already tried them. Popular enough for their use to come full circle from their initial rise to popularity in the 60’s and 70’s, and popular enough for individual states to begin to legalize them. With legalizations in place, or on the way, it should be expected that these numbers will only rise in the future.

Hello and welcome readers! Thanks for taking time to join us at Cannadelics.com, a top offering for independent news covering the cannabis and psychedelics spaces. We offer daily updates on important stories, as well as the Cannadelics Weekly Newsletter, which is chock full of news and product offers, straight to your email. Sign up and make sure you’re always on top of important stories, with access to the best products out there!





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All about Cannabis

Canada’s Medical Cannabis Reimbursements – Weed | Cannabis | Marijuana

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A record number of Canadian military veterans have received medical cannabis reimbursements. The federal government spent more than $150 million last fiscal year. The amount has doubled from only three years ago.

Veterans Affairs Canada is on track to spend $200 million on medical cannabis reimbursements this year.

Medical Cannabis Reimbursements for Vets

The rationale behind the reimbursements is the 2008 court decision requiring the federal government to provide “reasonable access” to medical cannabis. And it makes sense when the federal government already reimburses vets for pharmaceuticals.

The demand among veterans has soared since 2016. In November, the government overhauled how it dealt with medical cannabis reimbursements. The government reduced the amount of cannabis it would cover as a reimbursement, as well as the cost.

So-called “experts” applauded the decision, as they equate an absence of evidence as evidence of absence. Some believe military veterans are abusing cannabis to avoid their psychological trauma. But this is just further evidence of the cannabis industry‘s public health problem.

Can Canadians Afford This? 

Medical Cannabis Reimbursements

The November 2016 overhaul slashed medical cannabis reimbursements to three grams per day from the previous ten. The government gave those using more than three grams six months to either wean themselves down or find an additional means of income to afford their medicine.

Slashing medical cannabis reimbursements for vets came in the wake of an auditor general report. Citing “public health experts,” they decided that ten grams per day were too much.

Some can’t imagine putting a price on treating Canada’s vets with dignity. But the fact is that the year-over-year increase in medical cannabis reimbursements is unsustainable in the long term.

Should Vets Get Medical Cannabis Reimbursements?

Should Canada’s military veterans receive medical cannabis reimbursements? Most Canadians would likely argue yes. Whatever the annual cost, national defence is the federal government’s top priority (or, at least, it should be). And if that means combat vets need ten grams of medical cannabis per day for the rest of their lives – so be it.

If the federal government wants to reduce these costs, there are several ways to do it.

One:  Suppose the federal government wants the number of vets with PTSD and requiring medical cannabis reimbursements to go down. In that case, they can stop requiring our military to engage in activities that cause trauma.

They can stop sending Canada’s military to parts of the world where we have no business. “Peacekeeping” missions in Yugoslavia or Rwanda are an Orwellian way of describing war.

Two: They can defund other areas of the government. The federal government’s first (and some would argue, only) function is national defence. 

All additional government bureaucracies can be gutted or downsized to the provincial government. Or, ideally, returned to the private sector that handles resource allocation more efficiently and effectively.

Three: They can liberalize the cannabis industry, resulting in lower prices. Lower prices for the same or higher amounts of cannabis mean the cost of medical cannabis reimbursements goes down, even as usage or the number of vets increases.

In Summary

Canada's Medical Cannabis Reimbursements

A record number of Canadian military veterans receive medical cannabis reimbursements. This number increases year after year. Capping what vets can claim is a short-term solution if one can even call it a solution. “This is purely a cost-saving endeavour,” says Michael Blais, founder of Canadian Veterans Advocacy.

However, the most insulting part of all this is the “public health experts” suggesting that military vets are avoiding their problems or trauma by consuming medical cannabis instead of some toxic pharmaceutical.

The next time the Canadian government wants to engage in a conflict overseas, perhaps we can send politicians and public health busybodies instead. Keep the troops home. Station them in the Arctic. We have a lot of work to do up there. Russia is already claiming parts of the Arctic circle for itself.

We shouldn’t be so foolish as to believe that territory belongs to Canada just because it says so on a map. 





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Why Tobacco Prices Are Rising While Weed’s Are Dropping — And What That Means For You

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If you are a frequent cannabis purchaser you have likely noticed that some of your favorite cannabis products have stayed the same price, or even decreased over the last year. When prices on your favorite cannabis go down you likely don’t want to ask too many questions. Instead you are more likely to buy as much as you can and leave with a bag full of savings. 

Marijuana prices have indeed decreased or at least stayed stable recently. While this may not prompt suspicion, you have to wonder why a highly-taxed product like marijuana is not going up in price while tobacco, another taxed and regulated substance, continues to climb in price.

In order to understand why tobacco prices steadily increase while marijuana prices fluctuate, it is important to understand the differences between why and how these two products are taxed.

Tobacco is taxed on a federal and state level. One main reason tobacco is taxed on a federal level is to offset the mounting cost tobacco has on preventable medical costs. According to the CDC, cigarette smoking cost the United States more than $600 billion in 2018 alone. The money to cover these costs has to come from somewhere.

cannabis cigarette
Photo by Cappi Thompson/Getty Images

The other reason taxes in tobacco steadily increase, without dipping, is that increasing price is linked to smoking cessation (especially in young people). “Tax increases are the most reliable policy tool to encourage smokers to quit, discourage young people from trying cigarettes, and generate revenue to offset the public health costs of tobacco use,” according to Tobacconomics, an economic research group on tobacco control policy.

RELATED: Lessons The Recreational Cannabis Industry Can Learn From Big Tobacco

Marijuana is taxed heavily as well, but in a different manner than tobacco and with different goals. For one, marijuana is not taxed on a federal level, as it is not legal on a federal level. Instead it is taxed on state and local levels. Since marijuana is not linked to terminal disease like tobacco products are, the tax collected from marijuana is used for programs that often tend to benefit the state the marijuana is purchased in.

Most states use the collected tax revenue to support educational and treatment programs, law enforcement and even boost their state’s general fund. Colorado, for example, uses 71.85% of the tax revenue collected for “health care, health education, substance abuse prevention and treatment programs, and law enforcement,” according to the  Colorado General Assembly. More than 15% (15.56%) of the revenue goes to the state’s general fund. 

This shows that while both products are taxed highly, tobacco tax is aimed to stop people purchasing the product and decrease federal cost of healthcare issues caused by smoking. Marijuana tax is used to benefit the state it is purchased in, meaning there is likely no desire to decrease marijuana sales in states where it is legal, so keeping the product affordable is a wise idea. Overtaxing could hurt sales, and in turn hurt the state’s economy.

RELATED: Marijuana Vs. Alcohol: How The Two Industries Are Handling Inflation, And What That Means For Consumers

Another reason marijuana prices are going down while tobacco prices are going up has to do with how established (or unestablished) these two markets are. Tobacco and its leading companies have established their markets, brands and customers. This means while they can spend money on advertising and promotional offers to entice customers, the price is fairly established. 

Marijuana, on the other hand, is a very new market, especially the legal market. It is so new that major players are only just beginning to rise, and sometimes fall, as the industry grows. While this is an exciting time for the industry and those who support it, it is also an economically volatile time for those who are invested in it. There is a lot of competition in many states. The new cannabis boom has prompted a rush of entrepreneurs to enter this growing market. 

cannabis cigarette
Photo by Hugo Cattelain / EyeEm/Getty Images

This growth, however, has led to a bit of an over-saturation in some places, and also an over-abundance of product. “In some states, there’s simply too much product, leading to plunging prices. In California, for example, wholesale cannabis prices plummeted by about 50% last year,” according to Politico, which mentioned that Colorado, Washington and Oregon all saw significant declines as well. This is a major reason you have likely noticed those decreased prices lately. 

Marijuana is slowly growing in acceptance among lawmakers and the general population, which in turn will likely lead to it being accessible and affordable for years to come. Since it is a new market, prices are bound to fluctuate, but when they eventually settle the odds are they will not break your bank account.

While cigarettes and joints might look the same, the political and public acceptance of tobacco continues to decline. As more people want to see an end to nicotine addiction and the preventable death associated with it, there will likely only be further taxation and higher prices in the future.



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Learn All About High-Potency Cannabinoids and the Products Containing Them  

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In today’s cannabis market – at the very least, in states that don’t have legal recreational weed – high-potency products containing blends of extra strong cannabinoids and gaining popularity. But what exactly are these new compounds? Are they natural or synthetic? What makes them different from one another? And what kind of products contain them? Scroll down to learn all about high-potency products.

To stay current on everything important happening in the industry, subscribe to The Cannadelics Weekly Newsletter. Also, it’ll get you premium access to deals on cannabis flowers, vapes, edibles, and much more! We’ve also got standout offers on cannabinoids, like HHC-O, Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP HHC, which won’t kill your bank account. Head over to our “Best-of” lists to get these deals, and remember to enjoy responsibly!


What are high-potency cannabis products? 

High-potency cannabis products are just that, consumer weed products that contain the more psychoactive compounds found in the cannabis plant, as well as some new, synthetic variations. The two categories of cannabinoids that actually produce these type of effects are THCs (tetrahydrocannabinols) and HHCs (hexahydrocannabinols).  

When it comes to high-potency cannabis products, they can fall into one of three categories: products that contain only one high-potency cannabinoid, such as THC-P only products. You can also have products with a blend of high-potency cannabinoids, like THC-O, Delta 10, THCjd, and THCh mixed together. Or, you can have a product with very high concentrations of any psychoactive cannabinoid, like edibles with 100mg or more of delta 9 per serving.  

Typically, high-potency products consist of vapes, edibles, and concentrates. Flower products can be infused with stronger cannabinoids, but they still are not usually considered high-potency, because there really is a limit to how high one can get on smokables.  

More about THCs and HHCs 

First, let’s quickly review THCs. There are a total of at least 15 that we know of. There are 4 major types of THC that are naturally occurring in the plant: THCA, THCV, Delta 8 THC and Delta 9 THC. Then, we have a few synthetics like THC-O and Delta 10. And we also have some very trace cannabinoids (those that show up in very low amounts) like THCP. And then we have a whole slew of new THCs that very little remains known about, and these include THCjd and THCh.

We also have one, naturally occurring endocannabinoid that is in the family of THCs, and that’s 11-hydroxy THC. This is not a cannabinoid per se, but a metabolite that our body creates when we digest different types of THC. So, if you’re eating naturally occurring THCs, like Delta 8 or Delta 9, the effects in our bodies will be the same, because they are all converted to 11-hydroxy THC. Synthetic THCs may have different effects, this has not been thoroughly studied.  

Now, on to HHCs. There are way less HHCs than THCs, so at least it doesn’t get very confusing here. With hexahydrocannabinols we have HHC, HHC-O, and HHC-P. There is a biologically active naturally occurring (−)-hexahydrocannabinol, as well as its synthetic enantiomer (+)-hexahydrocannabinol. The synthetic HHC, which can be found in spice, has the chemical formula: 9-Nor-9β-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, and the natural variety, found in trace amounts in cannabis pollen, goes by the formula: 6aR,9R,10aR-Hexahydrocannabinol. 

Both HHC-O and HHC-P are synthetic. HHC-O is the acetate version of HHC. HHC-P has the same alkaline chain as HHC but with two extra carbons included. The addition of these extra carbons is believed to enhance its ability to bind to cannabinoid receptors in the human body – but again, much of this research is extremely new and limited.  

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Welcome all! Thanks for dropping by Cannadelics.com, a top offering for comprehensive news covering the burgeoning cannabis and psychedelics industries. Stop by daily for a dose of news on these dynamically changing fields, and sign up for The Cannadelics Weekly Newsletter, so you’re up on everything important going on.





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