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Step Aside Alcohol, There’s A New Weedy Vice King In Town

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Ever since Colorado legalized marijuana for recreational use back in 2012, it’s been no secret that it would create a financial windfall for both cannabis businesses, along with the State itself. A decade later, multiple other states have followed in the footsteps of the Centennial State in allowing their citizens to purchase cannabis in a manner similar to alcohol or liquor.

Although the assumption was that recreational marijuana sales would start off strong, experts couldn’t have predicted demand for it would be as high as it has been. Here are a few key indicators that reveal that alcohol is no longer ruler of the vice kingdom.

heres what happens when you mix marijuana and beer
Photo by BENCE BOROS via Unsplash

People Are Seeking New Alternatives to Alcohol

No one has been caught more off guard by the high demand for cannabis products than beer, wine and liquor companies. Sales tax revenue for alcohol has been surpassed by those of recreational marijuana. According to David Feldman, CEO of Skip Intro Advisors, a strategic consulting firm for up-and-coming cannabis brands, there are numerous reasons why tax revenue for cannabis has surpassed alcohol.

“Some states tax rates on marijuana sales are higher than that of alcohol, so this differential may partially reflect that,” he explained. “That said, it is an important milestone to see cannabis tax revenue exceed that of alcohol, as it appears more people are turning to cannabis as an alternative to more addictive products like alcohol and pain products.”

Numbers Don’t Lie

The idea that people are seeking alternatives to alcohol is demonstrated by the fact that only 60% of American adults reported drinking alcoholic beverages this year, which is down nearly 10% from a decade ago when that number was as high as 67%. Over the course of the past decade, the public perception of adult recreational cannabis use has shifted dramatically. That’s led to cannabis usage heading in the complete opposite direction of alcohol use, which is one of the main reasons it has surpassed alcohol in sales tax revenue. Research shows that roughly 22 million Americans use cannabis each month. 

RELATED: Marijuana Is Replacing Alcohol During The Pandemic And May Have Long Term Benefits

Further demonstrating America’s continued gravitation towards cannabis as an alternative to alcohol is that more studies predict that the rate of Americans who’ve at least tried marijuana will surpass 50% soon. Both Washington state and California are current examples of how nationwide legalization of cannabis could lead to alcohol playing second fiddle for good. California, for example, collected $369,028,000 in revenue from alcohol sales, compared to more than $1 billion in tax revenue from cannabis sales. The state of Washington happened to collect more than $229.4 million in sales tax revenue for cannabis products than for alcoholic products during the fiscal year of 2020. That trend shows no signs of slowing down.

RELATED: Alcohol Vs. Weed: How The Two Affect Young Adult Brains

According to data received from the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Bureau, sales tax revenue from cannabis products nearly tripled those of alcoholic products. While total sales tax revenue from alcohol was around $18,500,00, sales tax revenue for cannabis products totaled more than $46,503,315. The question is whether or not these sales tax figures will remain the same after the market for recreational cannabis starts to mature.

Smoking Marijuana
Photo by Jamie Grill/Getty Images

Will Cannabis’s Reign as King Last as Long as Alcohol?

After prohibition ended, alcohol was the substance of choice for several decades. The peak of America’s alcohol consumption occurred during the mid-to-late 1970s when more than 70% of Americans reported being drinkers. In the near century after the end of alcohol prohibition, Americans were likely overdue for a new vice to catch their attention and subsequently their wallets.

RELATED: Cannabis Vs. Craft Beer — How’s It Going?

As marijuana prohibition is now in its final phases, a question that’ll boggle the minds of cannabis users for years to come is what will be the substance of choice that threatens the crown that marijuana took from alcohol.



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alcohol

Step Aside Alcohol, There’s A New Weedy Vice King In Town

Published

on

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Ever since Colorado legalized marijuana for recreational use back in 2012, it’s been no secret that it would create a financial windfall for both cannabis businesses, along with the State itself. A decade later, multiple other states have followed in the footsteps of the Centennial State in allowing their citizens to purchase cannabis in a manner similar to alcohol or liquor.

Although the assumption was that recreational marijuana sales would start off strong, experts couldn’t have predicted demand for it would be as high as it has been. Here are a few key indicators that reveal that alcohol is no longer ruler of the vice kingdom.

heres what happens when you mix marijuana and beer
Photo by BENCE BOROS via Unsplash

People Are Seeking New Alternatives to Alcohol

No one has been caught more off guard by the high demand for cannabis products than beer, wine and liquor companies. Sales tax revenue for alcohol has been surpassed by those of recreational marijuana. According to David Feldman, CEO of Skip Intro Advisors, a strategic consulting firm for up-and-coming cannabis brands, there are numerous reasons why tax revenue for cannabis has surpassed alcohol.

“Some states tax rates on marijuana sales are higher than that of alcohol, so this differential may partially reflect that,” he explained. “That said, it is an important milestone to see cannabis tax revenue exceed that of alcohol, as it appears more people are turning to cannabis as an alternative to more addictive products like alcohol and pain products.”

Numbers Don’t Lie

The idea that people are seeking alternatives to alcohol is demonstrated by the fact that only 60% of American adults reported drinking alcoholic beverages this year, which is down nearly 10% from a decade ago when that number was as high as 67%. Over the course of the past decade, the public perception of adult recreational cannabis use has shifted dramatically. That’s led to cannabis usage heading in the complete opposite direction of alcohol use, which is one of the main reasons it has surpassed alcohol in sales tax revenue. Research shows that roughly 22 million Americans use cannabis each month. 

RELATED: Marijuana Is Replacing Alcohol During The Pandemic And May Have Long Term Benefits

Further demonstrating America’s continued gravitation towards cannabis as an alternative to alcohol is that more studies predict that the rate of Americans who’ve at least tried marijuana will surpass 50% soon. Both Washington state and California are current examples of how nationwide legalization of cannabis could lead to alcohol playing second fiddle for good. California, for example, collected $369,028,000 in revenue from alcohol sales, compared to more than $1 billion in tax revenue from cannabis sales. The state of Washington happened to collect more than $229.4 million in sales tax revenue for cannabis products than for alcoholic products during the fiscal year of 2020. That trend shows no signs of slowing down.

RELATED: Alcohol Vs. Weed: How The Two Affect Young Adult Brains

According to data received from the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Bureau, sales tax revenue from cannabis products nearly tripled those of alcoholic products. While total sales tax revenue from alcohol was around $18,500,00, sales tax revenue for cannabis products totaled more than $46,503,315. The question is whether or not these sales tax figures will remain the same after the market for recreational cannabis starts to mature.

Smoking Marijuana
Photo by Jamie Grill/Getty Images

Will Cannabis’s Reign as King Last as Long as Alcohol?

After prohibition ended, alcohol was the substance of choice for several decades. The peak of America’s alcohol consumption occurred during the mid-to-late 1970s when more than 70% of Americans reported being drinkers. In the near century after the end of alcohol prohibition, Americans were likely overdue for a new vice to catch their attention and subsequently their wallets.

RELATED: Cannabis Vs. Craft Beer — How’s It Going?

As marijuana prohibition is now in its final phases, a question that’ll boggle the minds of cannabis users for years to come is what will be the substance of choice that threatens the crown that marijuana took from alcohol.



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Continue Reading

alcohol

This Drinking Habit Could Be Good For Your Health

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When discussing drinking habits, the majority of us look for ways of decreasing it or at least keeping it under a certain margin. Thanks to years of studying its effect on humans, it’s common knowledge that the consumption of too much alcohol is bad for your health.

But a new study found some links between alcohol consumption and positive heart health. Of course, there’s a caveat.

RELATED: Drinking This Makes People Happier, Study Finds

Has The Pandemic Changed Your Drinking Habits? Here's How To Know
Photo by Fred Moon via Unsplash

The study, published in the European Journal of Preventative Cardiology, found that consuming moderate amounts of alcohol was positive for people’s heart health, preventing heart disease.

The data examined 18,000 people over the age of 70 in America and Australia. Researchers found that participants who consumed between 51 to 150 grams a week of alcohol had less risk of developing cardiovascular disease when compared to those who didn’t drink at all.

While it’s safe to assume that moderate consumption of alcohol is not bad for your heart health, it’s important to recognize that the study doesn’t imply that drinking alcohol is good for preventing cardiovascular disease. While a link was found, more research is necessary in order to draw a clearer picture. Researchers also said that the majority of participants were healthy, meaning that their results might not encapsulate that of the general population.

RELATED: This Alcoholic Drink May Have Some Beauty Benefits, Study Finds

Still, the data is pretty interesting, especially when applied to an older demographic. Maybe the people who consume alcohol on a regular basis are less stressed and thus more likely to have positive heart health, or maybe, alcohol can be used as a relaxation method or as a way of bonding with other people.

A lot of questions remain, but, as long as you’re drinking with control and are maintaining a relatively healthy and active lifestyle, you should be okay.



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Has The Pandemic Changed Your Drinking Habits? Here’s How To Know

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One of the first effects of the pandemic was the fact that most people simply started drinking more. Working from home and those first few months of lockdown made it seem like there was no clock, blurring the lines between weekdays and weekend, enabling people to drink more without feeling like there were repercussions.

Alcohol companies capitalized on their power during the pandemic, using our stress to their advantage. When speaking to the New York Times, Elyse Grossman, a policy fellow at Johns Hopkins, said that this behavior is dangerous. “It’s not an ordinary product, like coffee or pencils. It’s the third-leading cause of preventable death in the U.S.”

You Should Monitor Your Wine Intake If You Suffer From This Medical Condition
Photo by Alfonso Scarpa via Unsplash

While a lot of people returned to their normal drinking habits once they got used to the pandemic, others didn’t, and may still experience changes in their drinking habits despite going back to their offices and leading more normal lives.

Here are some cues that can inform you on whether or not your drinking habits have changed. While these changes can be for the better, if you’ve dramatically increased your alcohol intake, it’s important to talk to someone and make some changes if necessary, developing a relationship with alcohol that’s healthy and that works positively for you:

You drink more than you planned to

Binge Drinking Plummeting in States With Legalized Marijuana
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Whether you’re alone or with others, you might find yourself drinking more than you planned to, or getting drunk without having that intent when the night first started. This could be due to developing these patterns following the pandemic or simply adapting to now hanging out in bars and surrounding yourself with more people. This behavior is particularly difficult to avoid, especially since once you start drinking it becomes more difficult to stop.

RELATED: You Should Monitor Your Wine Intake If You Suffer From This Medical Condition

Some things that can help is limiting the amount of times you put yourself in this situation, having a glass of water after each drink, being mindful of how much you’re drinking and making plans ahead of time, that way you go into the evening with a plan.

Your tolerance levels have changed


Photo by Andrea Piacquadio via Pexels

Changes in your alcohol tolerance are to be expected if you’ve had more or less alcohol throughout the pandemic. You may find yourself drinking more than you used to and being surrounded by drunk friends while you’re sober. The opposite might also be true; you may have consumed less alcohol over the previous months and now find that your tolerance is lower and you get drunk much more easily.

In order to prevent issues, it helps to make a plan before hand and to avoid driving when you’re going out for drinks. Go out with people you trust and make sure you all have each other’s backs.

You don’t want to drink anymore

How To Make Friends As An Adult
Photo by Raghu Nayyar via Unsplash

RELATED: Drinking This Every Day Can Reduce Your Odds Of Heart Disease

If, following the pandemic, you simply are not into as drinking as you were before, that’s fine, even though it might take a few tries for you and your friends to find social stuff to do that’s still fun for everyone. Consider other social plans you can do together, like working out, watching a movie, or having a meal together. The smaller and more trustworthy the group, the more comfortable you’ll feel with being open and discussing your attitude regarding alcohol use.



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