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What Is The Best Way To Grow Weed?

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Soil is the most well-known and recognizable growing medium. Cannabis and other plants have been grown in soil for many years. But there are now a lot of additional soilless growing options available for your cannabis.

A cannabis plant can grow and flower regardless of the medium as long as the roots have room to expand and access fresh oxygen, water, and the right nutrients. However, the majority of growers will have a strong personal preference for a particular medium based on factors like desired yields, ease of use, and growing space. The following is a list of the most typical media utilized by expert growers in the cannabis industry:

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Photo by CRYSTALWEED cannabis via Unsplash

Growing Cannabis in Soil 

In addition to an outdoor planting area, continuous monitoring, and a basic understanding of soil management, growing weed in soil demands a lot of patience. Although most beginners adopt this strategy, there may be some issues before you can eventually reap the rewards of your labor. You won’t have much trouble following the steps if you’ve ever grown plants indoors or outdoors before.

The potential for the success of outdoor cannabis cultivation is its biggest benefit. The size and height your plants may attain will give you a year’s worth of freshly produced cannabis if you have enough room to plant your seeds. The trick is to create and keep up perfect growing conditions, which don’t just rely on the soil’s nutrients and growing characteristics.

Pros and Cos of Growing Weed in Soil 

Pros:

  • Reduced costs.
  • The process is easy to understand and follow
  • Requires no special equipment
  • Massive cannabis harvest
  • Eco-friendly technology.

Cons:

  • Less control of the result.
  • Local weather and climate can be a problem.
  • Requires continuous supervision.

Growing Cannabis in Rockwool  

A substrate called rockwool is made by spinning molten basaltic rock into fine strands. How does it relate to marijuana cultivation? Rockwool appears to be the ideal substrate for hydroponic growing setups. Rockwool is widely used in commercial cannabis production and is not disregarded by personal hydroponic growers due to its inert qualities, natural capacity to hold water, and ability to give adequate oxygenation to the plant roots.

RELATED: What Is Rockwool And Why Is It A New Buzzword In The Marijuana Industry?

The idea of growing marijuana in rockwool initially strikes you as odd. But with all of the advantages, it’s the best option for those just starting with hydroponic horticulture. No less rigorous than the others, rockwool media is completely devoid of organic materials. Additionally, the surroundings are clean and devoid of harmful metals.

Why bother looking at other growth mediums if rockwool is so perfect for growing cannabis? Rockwool is not an exception to the norm; no media is ideal. Rockwool’s effect on the environment is its main drawback. It cannot be recycled, is not biodegradable, and is typically not produced in a sustainable manner.

rockwool
Photo by Reni Purnama Sari/Getty Images

Pros and Cons of Rockwool Planting 

Pros:

  • It can be used for both hydroponics and soil growing.
  • It is not difficult to set up and maintain.
  • The growing environment is germ-free, free from organic threats and metals.
  • It provides good drainage and easy root penetration.
  • Warmth, moisture, and darkness of rockwool cubes result in great germination.

Cons:

  • It is not an eco-friendly method.
  • Stabilizing water pH can be a serious issue.
  • Rockwool is not sustainable or biodegradable.

Growing Cannabis in Peat Moss 

Cannabis grown with peat moss increases the likelihood of a plentiful harvest and decreases the likelihood of failure. Both growers using soil and those using hydroponics can benefit from the usage of peat moss as a fertilizer. However, don’t squander time if you intend to employ peat moss in your nearby cannabis garden. Weeks are needed to prepare peat moss for gardening.

RELATED: Rookie Errors To Avoid When You Are Just Starting To Grow Weed

The excellent news is that peat moss can be used to achieve the ideal pH for cannabis. An expert grower is aware of the significance of a balanced pH. Peat moss can be used with alkaline soil additions because of its acidic pH level. As a result, successful cultivation and efficient absorption of all necessary nutrients are guaranteed.

Pros and Cons of Using Peat Moss 

Pros:

  • Adds healthy nutrients.
  • Has promising water-holding capacity.
  • Carries an important role in the acidifying process.
  • Has outstanding resistant properties and is contamination free.
  • Enriches the grow environment with beneficial microorganisms.

Cons:

  • Requires much time to prepare.
  • Can lead to soil compression.
  • Raises concerns of sustainability.
growing marijuana
Photo by Cappi Thompson/Getty Images

Growing Cannabis in Coco + Perlite  

Another alternate option that is well-liked by cannabis enthusiasts is growing marijuana in coco coir. Before weed gardeners discovered how to make use of the coconut husk, it was seen as a waste product. Its refined fiber provides an almost ideal environment for marijuana cultivation. This medium, which has an average pH of 6.5-7.0 and is oxygen-rich and superbly water-retentive, is beneficial for both outdoor and indoor plants.

Cannabis grown by flushing in coco is the most environmentally friendly method. This process is completely recyclable and green. To improve your probability of a fruitful and successful harvest, you can choose to add specific cannabis perlite. Both soil and hydroponic farming schools advise using the obsidian supplement perlite. It stimulates root development, boosts oxygen levels, and reduces soil weight when applied to coco coir.

RELATED: Is There Really Any Difference Between Cannabis Grown Indoors Vs. Outdoors?

Although it takes more work and knowledge, growing cannabis on coco coir produces significantly better results than growing it in just soil. Try planting in coco coir as the next upgrade if soil growing is no longer difficult for you.

It is more difficult to choose between peat moss and coconut coir. Go for coco coir without hesitation if you are a committed conservationist or in a time crunch.  Give peat moss a try if you enjoy gardening in general, strive for the finest outcome, and have enough time to prepare the growing medium. Contrasting these mediums’ characteristics is challenging. It is therefore preferable if you can examine peat moss and coco coir in action to evaluate which result best suits your needs.

Pros and Cons of Coco + Perlite  

Pros:

  • The technique is easy.
  • Coco coir is as accessible as soil.
  • It is a totally eco-friendly cultivation process.
  • Has a light structure that is better for root development.

Cons:

  • Needs to be hydrated in order to activate.
  • Requires nutrients, such as cannabis perlite.

Bottom Line

Different cannabis enthusiasts and growers have their preferred method of growing cannabis, with each method having its advantages and drawbacks, some more than others. Using these methods is acceptable, you just have to know the pros and cons and choose what’s best for you.

This article originally appeared on Cannabis.net and has been reposted with permission.



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Cannabis

Men Or Women? Who Benefits More From Using Weed Before Sex?

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A new study adds more evidence of marijuana’s positive impact on sex. Results show that cannabis increases the odds of orgasms and makes people more likely to experience pleasure. Most importantly, the study claims that the plant could be impactful for women, helping treat sexual dysfunctions and reducing the orgasm inequality gap.

The study, published in the Journal of Cannabis Research and conducted by researchers from East Carolina University, focused on survey responses from 811 adults between the ages of 18 and 85. The majority of them identified as female and all had previous experience with cannabis.

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“The purpose of this study was to examine the perceived influence of cannabis on sexual functioning and satisfaction,” researchers wrote.

Responses show that most participants, regardless of age and gender, reported experiencing more pleasure and satisfaction when having sex after consuming cannabis.

RELATED: Why Cannabis Users Have Better Orgasms & Overall Sexual Function, According To Study

A closer look at the results show that 70% of respondents said that using cannabis before sex made them more likely to experience an orgasm while also increasing their desire. 62% said the drug increased pleasure while masturbating.

One of the strengths of the study is the fact that it used subjects of various backgrounds. For example, researchers made sure that their subjects were involved in multiple work industries, had varying cannabis preferences, ages and sexual orientations (almost 25% of the participants were identified as LGBTQIA+). After accounting for factors that could have altered their results, they concluded that the sex life of both men and women benefitted from the addition of marijuana.

“This study updates the current literature on cannabis and sexuality and provides implications for improving sexual quality,” researchers wrote. “Medical implications of this study include the possible use of cannabis for treating sexual dysfunctions, especially within women.”

cannabis and sex
Photo by Prostock-Studio/Getty Images

RELATED: How Cannabis Can Improve Your Sex Life

In the case of women, the study suggested marijuana could help them treat various medical dysfunctions while helping close the orgasm inequality gap, a phenomenon that refers to the disparity between heterosexual men and women when it comes to orgasms.

“Women may be more likely to orgasm when using cannabis before sexual encounters, which could contribute to equity in the amount of sexual pleasure and satisfaction experienced by both women and men. Sex therapists could incorporate use of cannabis in states where it is currently legal,” argued the researchers.



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More Weed, More Problems? – Cannabis | Weed | Marijuana

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More weed, more problems? As in, if you smoke all day, everyday, your life is likely a hot mess with no hope of redemption? According to recent research from CU Boulder, the answer to “more weed, more problems” is no.

According to researchers, legalizing recreational cannabis at the state level does not lead to an increase in substance use disorders. Or even increased use of illicit drugs among adults. In fact, it may even decrease issues related to alcohol abuse.

A study involving over 4,000 twins from Colorado and Minnesota found no correlation between cannabis legalization and any increases in cognitive, psychological, social, relationship, or financial problems.

“We really didn’t find any support for a lot of the harms people worry about with legalization,” said lead author Stephanie Zellers. “From a public health perspective, these results are reassuring.”

The study, published in Psychological Medicine, was conducted by researchers from the University of Minnesota, CU Boulder and the CU Anschutz Medical Campus. The study used data from two of the nation’s most extensive and longest-running twin studies: one located at IBG and the other at the Minnesota Center for Twin Family Research.

What Are Twin Studies? 

More Weed, More Problems?

Can twin studies prove that more weed doesn’t equal more problems? Well, what are twin studies?

Twin studies are research designs that compare identical (monozygotic) and fraternal (dizygotic) twins. The idea is that identical twins share all their genes, while fraternal twins share only about half of their genes.

So any differences between the two types of twins can help researchers identify which traits or conditions are likely influenced by genetics and which are likely influenced by environment. Researchers can use twin studies to study a wide range of topics, including genetics, development, and health.

IBG stands for Institute of Behavioral Genetics, a research center at the University of Colorado Boulder. The Minnesota Center for Twin Family Research located at the University of Minnesota.

Both centers conduct twin studies and have been collecting data over the years. And both centers are among the nation’s most prominent and longest-running twin studies. They provide researchers with a wealth of data on genetic and environmental factors related to human behaviour and development.

The Problem with Twin Studies

Of course, Twin studies are not without their critics.

  1. Assumption of equal environments: Twin studies sometimes assume that identical and fraternal twins are raised in similar environments, but this may not always be the case. For example, identical twins may be treated more similarly than fraternal twins, which could affect the results.
  2. Limited generalizability: Researchers often conduct twin studies on small, specific samples, such as twins from a particular country or region. This limits the generalizability of the findings to other populations.
  3. Missing heritability: Twin studies estimate the proportion of variation in a trait or condition due to genetics. But they do not account for all the genetic variation that may influence the trait or condition.
  4. Complexity of human behaviour: Many complex human behaviours and conditions, such as mental disorders or intelligence, likely result from multiple genes and environmental factors. Twin studies may not fully capture these interactions.
  5. Selection bias: Twins who volunteer for studies might differ from twins who do not volunteer, which can bias the results.

Twin Studies Disprove More Weed, More Problems? 

More Weed, More Problems?

The researchers of this “more weed, more problems” study compared the 40% of twins who reside in states where recreational cannabis is legal to those who live in states where it remains illegal to understand the overall impact of legalization.

Researchers have been tracking the participants, who are now between the ages of 24 and 49, since their adolescence. They’ve been gathering information on their use of alcohol, tobacco, cannabis and several other illicit drugs, as well as assessing their overall well-being.

By specifically comparing twins within 240 pairs, in which one twin lives in a state with legal cannabis and the other where it is not, the researchers aimed to identify any changes caused by cannabis legalization.

The researchers previously found that identical twins residing in states where recreational cannabis is legal tend to use it around 20% more often than their twins living in states where it remains illegal.

So does that mean more weed, more problems?

To answer this question, the team compared survey results that examined 23 indicators of “psychosocial distress.” Including the use of alcohol and illicit drugs like cocaine and heroin, psychological distress, financial difficulties, cognitive issues, unemployment, and relationship issues both at home and at work.

“We included everything we had data on with the goal of getting a well-rounded look at the impacts on the whole person,” said Zellers. “Big picture, there’s not much there.”

No, More Weed Does Not Equal More Problems

More Weed, More Problems?

So is “more weed, more problems” debunked?

Researchers found no relationship between legal cannabis and an increased risk of “cannabis use disorder” or dependency.

For years, critics have called cannabis a “gateway” drug to harder substances like cocaine and heroin. The researchers found no changes post-legalization.

“For low-level cannabis use, which was the majority of users, in adults, legalization does not appear to increase the risk of substance use disorders,” said co-author Dr. Christian Hopfer.

Not only does this study question the “more weed, more problems” narrative, but it also shows legal cannabis’ benefit. People in legal states are less likely to develop alcohol dependency problems, including driving drunk.

“Our study suggests that we should not be overly concerned about everyday adult use in a legalized environment. But no drug is risk-free,” said John Hewitt, professor of psychology and neuroscience at CU Boulder.

While the study found no adverse effects on the daily lives of cannabis-consuming adults, the study also found no evidence that legal cannabis benefited people’s cognitive, psychological, social, relationship, or financial status.

Overall, the study seems to suggest the same thing we have before. Substances are neutral. It is the person who can choose to use or abuse them. But the drugs themselves have no innate power of control.





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Health Canada: Let’s Ban Potent Cannabis Extracts  – Cannabis | Weed | Marijuana

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Despite a healthcare system already on the verge of collapse pre-COVID, Health Canada bureaucrats have focused on cannabis companies selling extracts.

Health Canada recently requested federally licensed cannabis companies to discontinue the sale of cannabis products the bureaucracy considers mislabeled. Health Canada is concerned adults are consuming products labelled “extracts” as “edibles.”

The move is expected to cost cannabis companies millions of dollars. And it comes at a time when most publicly traded cannabis producers are still losing money.

Why target products that have been on the market for three years? Health Canada has not responded to any media on the topic, including Cannabis Life Network’s request for clarification.

Health Canada: Let's Ban Cannabis Extracts 

While Health Canada’s targeting of cannabis extracts surprises many, others, like CLN, have been expecting this move for a while.

In the letter seen by MJBizDaily, Health Canada said that “upon further review of the products in question, Health Canada has assessed that this product is edible cannabis and, consequently, it contains a quantity of THC that exceeds the allowable limit of 10 mg per immediate container.”

The letter goes on to define “extract,” “edible,” and “food.”

“Health Canada has determined that (the products in question) are consumed in the same manner as food, and therefore fit the definition of edible cannabis,” the Health Canada letter says.

Cannabis extracts cannot exceed 1,000 milligrams per container, one hundred times more than Health Canada permits in the edible class. Ergo, companies would instead produce extracts than edibles.

However, the line has gotten blurred, and this is likely what concerns the bureaucracy’s busybodies. For example, New Brunswick-based cannabis producer Organigram has a “Jolts” product advertised as a lozenge. While each candy is 10mg, the entire pack of 100mg.

Likewise, Redecan has a cannabis extract containing 800 to 1000mg of THC per bottle. However, the oral dispensing syringe caps each “dose” at 8-10mg. 

Are these the products Health Canada wants discontinued?

Health Canada On Extracts: Useless

Health Canada: Let's Ban Cannabis Extracts 

Why Health Canada? And why now? Why at all?

Industry sources expect to lose tens of millions if Health Canada demands extracts and lozenges get pulled from the Canadian cannabis market. They also expect the illicit and legacy markets to fill the void.

Regardless of what you think about public health and safety or an individual’s freedom to consume as much THC as they want, there’s significant concern about how Health Canada is going about this.

This kind of regulatory enforcement is akin to banana republics. Health Canada has already approved these products. Organigram’s “Jolts” have been on the market for over a year.

Producers of these extracts followed all the rules and regulations. And now Health Canada will arbitrarily limit (or ban) these products because… what? Canadian consumers prefer potent extracts over weak-ass edibles?

The lesson here is to remove all THC limits, not bring the hammer down on companies producing legal products. This is not how you regulate an industry.

Infantilizing Adults

While Health Canada hasn’t responded to a request for comment, I suspect the justification will likely be over “public health” and “increased hospitalizations from high-THC products.”

Another way of saying: we’re so bad at delivering health care that instead of improving it, we’re going to start controlling the behaviours that may lead people to need a hospital bed.

That’s the most insulting part of all of this. Health Canada treats adult cannabis consumers like children by limiting their autonomy and decision-making.

Actions speak louder than words. Health Canada bureaucrats (who live off our taxes) lack trust in cannabis-consuming adults to make their own choices and take responsibility for their actions.

When regulations are not based on evidence or are not well-reasoned, they are an infringement on personal liberty and autonomy.

Even with “conventional thinking,” in which government regulations are effective and immune to corruption and politics, it’s essential that regulators balance the need to protect public health and safety with the need to respect adults’ autonomy and decision-making abilities.

Health Canada’s crackdown on cannabis extracts clearly violates that balance. 

This situation would be like if Health Canada discovered that vodka and whiskey were stronger than beer. And so they order distilleries across the nation to arbitrarily limit their alcohol content and take the products off the shelves.

Health Canada has no business regulating cannabis. 

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