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A Hiring Wave on the Horizon

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The U.S. cannabis industry is on the brink of a significant hiring wave in 2024, spurred by a 12% increase in legal sales in 2023, reaching $29 billion. This growth, alongside potential federal reclassification of cannabis, is expected to create up to 100,000 new jobs, particularly in the retail sector, where 93% of companies plan to expand their workforce. The Vangst 2024 Cannabis Salary Guide highlights an industry ready to bounce back from previous economic stagnation, with a strong emphasis on experience, adaptability, and cultural fit in prospective employees.

The cannabis sector is poised for a massive expansion in employment opportunities in 2024, following a year of economic challenges and layoffs. This optimistic forecast comes from Vangst’s latest industry salary guide, which anticipates a hiring boom driven by increased legal cannabis sales and the potential for federal rescheduling. The anticipated move to reclassify cannabis to Schedule III could significantly reduce tax burdens, increase company valuations, and attract more investors, according to Viridian Capital Advisors.

Retail cannabis companies are at the forefront of this hiring surge, with nearly all surveyed indicating plans to bolster their teams in response to growing demand and market expansion. The focus is not just on filling positions but on finding candidates who can navigate the evolving legal and market landscape, prioritize cultural fit, and possess strong communication skills over traditional qualifications.

Salaries in the cannabis industry have also seen an uptick, with top-end wages growing by 4.7%, outpacing the national non-cannabis average. However, the sector still trails behind others in offering comprehensive benefits packages, a gap that affects employee satisfaction and retention. The demand for health insurance and better work-life balance is clear among job seekers in the cannabis space.

Diversity and inclusion are gaining traction within cannabis company hiring practices, with a significant portion of companies implementing strategies to create a more inclusive workforce. The industry’s employment of veterans and individuals with disabilities highlights its diverse nature, but there remains room for improvement.

Why It Matters: This hiring wave marks a pivotal moment for the cannabis industry, signaling a shift towards recovery and growth after a period of stagnation. It underscores the industry’s resilience and its potential to contribute significantly to the economy through job creation and increased sales.

Potential Implications: The anticipated hiring boom in the cannabis industry could lead to wider acceptance and normalization of cannabis use, further influencing policy changes and societal attitudes. Additionally, the focus on diversity and inclusion could set a precedent for other sectors, promoting a more inclusive workforce across industries.

Source: Green Market Report



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Castle Pines sued by landowner for stopping city’s first McDonald’s

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“No clown in our town!” residents chanted as they hoisted homemade protest signs that read, “No McDonald’s double drive-thru fast food dispensary on Castle Pines Parkway.”

It was May 28 in the bedroom community of Castle Pines, where the City Council was weighing whether to allow construction of the town’s first McDonald’s. About 100 people attended and two dozen testified. Most in the crowd and on the council were opposed.

“Garbage fast food that attracts low-income, high-yield traffic from a very busy highway isn’t what I want,” a woman testified. Another warned, “Your average McDonald’s transient customer — which means half are below average — isn’t the element we should be promoting.”

Read the rest of this story on TheKnow.DenverPost.com.



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Kroger-Albertsons merger could lead to sale of 91 stores across Colorado

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Kroger and Albertsons would unload 91 grocery stores in Colorado if the companies prevail over lawsuits and regulators’ opposition to a merger of the two large supermarket chains.

The stores on the list of ones that would be sold to C&S Wholesale Grocers are spread across the state, ranging from Alamosa and Cortez to Fraser and Frisco with several in metro Denver. Two Albertsons stores are on the list of those to be sold. The rest are Safeways. That’s the bulk of the 105 Albertsons and Safeways in the state.

A dairy plant, an entire distribution center and part of another one in Denver would also be part of the deal with C&S Wholesale grocers.

Read the rest of this story on TheKnow.DenverPost.com.



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These Denver neighborhoods have attracted cannabis businesses in a big way, but not much else

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Roger Cobb has spent his life in Denver, bouncing around different neighborhoods before coming to settle in Northeast Park Hill. When he rides his new motorcycle — named Purple Rain — around the city, he notices how community resources are distributed.

“If you cross (Quebec Street), there’s about six, seven, eight different pools over there,” Cobb said last week at the Northeast Park Hill Coalition’s June membership meeting. “We have, really, two.”

Celeste Leonard, 14, drops into the deep end of the pool from the slide at the Hiawatha Davis Jr. Recreation Center in Denver Friday, June 21, 2024. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post)

Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.



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