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Why Cocaine Makes People Speak About Themselves

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Have you ever found yourself stuck talking to a coke-fueled ego maniac at a party? Or, let’s be even more honest here, have you ever realized after a night out that you were in fact that same coke-fueled ego maniac? Well, regardless of whether it’s you or someone else, the truth is that cocaine – for all of its ‘helpful’ confidence boosting – can definitely make people speak a lot more about themselves.

Cocaine, a powerful stimulant derived from the coca plant, has long been associated with heightened self-confidence, euphoria, and talkativeness. For decades, it has been a party drug of choice, often noted for its ability to make users speak at length about themselves and their experiences. But why is this? We’re going to delve into this question, understanding where this ego boost comes from, and why no one seems to acknowledge that it’s happening to them. 

What is Cocaine? 

Before we talk about the egotistical tendencies that coke can cause, let’s have a quick reminder of what cocaine actually is. Cocaine is a powerful central nervous system stimulant drug that is derived from the leaves of the coca plant, which is native to South America. It is a highly addictive substance that has been used for centuries by indigenous peoples in the Andes for its stimulant effects.

When it was first discovered, the substance was seen as one sent from the gods due to its medical benefits and ability to reduce the feeling of hunger. Nowadays, cocaine is one of the most common party drugs used around the world. Coke is classified as a Schedule II controlled substance in the United States, and it typically comes in the form of a white powder and can be ingested in various ways, including snorting, injecting, or smoking. The effects of the substance include:

  • Euphoria: Cocaine use can induce intense feelings of pleasure and well-being.
  • Increased energy and alertness: Users often experience increased energy levels, heightened alertness, and a decreased need for sleep.
  • Increased heart rate and blood pressure: Cocaine is a powerful stimulant that can lead to elevated heart rate and blood pressure, which can be dangerous, especially for individuals with heart conditions.
  • Increased confidence and talkativeness: Users may feel more confident and talkative when under the influence of cocaine.

The last effect listed is what is significant for this article. The reason why cocaine does make people so confident and able to talk about themselves – with often very little filter – is sometimes mind boggling. In fact, a whole group of people being on the drug, can often make it impossible for you to be the only one not on it. Unless, of course, you want the most boring night of your life, with no one having any interest in what you’re up to or who you are. 

Cocaine Confidence – The Ego Boost

Before diving into the psychology behind cocaine-induced self-expression, it’s important to understand the drug’s effects. Cocaine primarily affects the central nervous system, leading to increased alertness, energy, and a sense of invincibility. Users often report feeling more self-assured and charismatic, which can lead to an overwhelming desire to share their thoughts and experiences with others. One of the most significant effects of cocaine is the surge in self-confidence.

If you’ve ever taken the substance, or have seen someone that has, you’ll notice this sudden belief that you can do anything, talk about anything, be anything. It’s like you’ve just been given a pep talk by the greatest life coach ever. You feel, in a lot of ways, invincible. Cocaine temporarily increases levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with pleasure and reward.

This dopamine rush can lead users to feel more confident, outgoing, and self-assured than they do in their sober state. This newfound confidence can be a driving force behind the desire to talk about oneself. Imagine, you’re filling up with dopamine, feeling incredible, and the only way to release all of this new-found happiness is to let it out… perhaps verbally. Vice News writes:

“Of course, not everyone turns into a big sentient clenched jaw after half a gram—lots of us can do cocaine without becoming self-obsessed or arrogant or devoid of all self-awareness. But some of us can’t, which is where the “cocaine dickhead” archetype comes from: the girl who won’t stop banging on about her screenplay; the guy who wouldn’t be able to gauge the vibe of the room (extremely anti-him) if it was written out in spray paint on the wall.”

These archetypes, whilst comical, are unfortunately completely accurate. There seriously isn’t much worse than being stuck being talked at by someone who’s taken a copious amount of this specific substance. “Yeah I work in recruitment, mate. It’s alright but I’ve actually been thinking about doing something else. You know? Or maybe travelling. I feel like I need to see the world and get out of this suffocating suit. You know?” As Vice reports, not everyone turns into an egotist when consuming cocaine, but it certainly is not uncommon. 

Why? 

So it seems the only question to really ask is: why? Why does cocaine cause people to feel like they need, without any censorship, to talk about themselves. In addition, why do they also not realise how much they’re doing it. Well, festival welfare worker Katy Mcleod (director of Chill Welfare), says in Vice:

“Cocaine tends to make people go into themselves, so they can either become introverted or be very sociable but a bit dominant or self-involved… One big issue with coke is how it makes you feel in yourself and how you come across to others when under the influence. The two don’t always match up. You might think you’re being really witty and outgoing, when other people just think you’re a twat.”

So, as you can see, there’s a dichotomy here. There’s how you feel about yourself, and there’s how the world perceives you. To be fair, this probably exists most of the time anyway but, when cocaine is consumed, the difference is a lot more extreme. This comes from the dopamine hit that coke gives. 

Euphoria and Ego Inflation

Cocaine’s primary mechanism of action involves blocking the reuptake of dopamine in the brain. This results in an accumulation of dopamine in the synapses, leading to intensified feelings of pleasure and reward. The increased dopamine levels reinforce behaviour associated with the drug’s effects, including self-expression. Cocaine also induces euphoria, a state of intense happiness and well-being. This elevated mood can lead users to believe they are more interesting, intelligent, and captivating than usual. As a result, they may feel compelled to share their thoughts, stories, and opinions, convinced that they are the centre of attention. Essentially, you not only feel great, but you also think you are great. Hired Power writes:

“It boost’s a user’s ego and self-confidence, making the user believe that he is the most powerful person in the room.”

Cocaine gives you license to have social confidence, as well as confidence in yourself, which can be quite extreme. This doesn’t sound too bad, does it? Well it wouldn’t if you didn’t then spend an entire evening thinking that your voice deserves to be heard by everyone all night. The danger in an ego boost is that it can make you blind. Make you believe that you are the boss. Again, there’s nothing wrong with self-belief, but too much can become arrogant and hugely irritating. 

Final Thoughts on Cocaine Ego Boosts

Scientifically the ego-boost phenomenon of cocaine makes sense. A boost of dopamine, energy and confidence, makes users believe that they are the bees knees and they want people to know it. For some, with social anxiety, this can be a great moment – finally able to speak to people like they want to. For others, this can be an enhancement in ego they simply do not need. These sorts of people are the ones you want to avoid at parties, unless of course you want to hear (for hours on end) about their very interesting ideas on modern politics.

It’s important to say, of course, that cocaine is a highly dangerous substance and is incredibly addictive. This ego-boosting effect of cocaine is perhaps one of the most addictive parts of it and, worst of all, it can make it very hard to have any self-confidence without the substance. The effects of cocaine may be harnessed for that initial boost of confidence before an event, but those effects can very easily create an ego-tistical monster if you’re not careful. 

Hello readers. We’re happy to have you with us at Cannadelics.com; a news source here to bring you the best in independent reporting for the growing cannabis and hallucinogen fields. Join us frequently to stay on top of everything, and subscribe to our Cannadelics Weekly Newsletter, for updates straight to your email. Check out some awesome promos for cannabis buds, smoking devices and equipment like vapes, edibles, cannabinoid compounds, amanita mushroom products, and a whole bunch more. Let’s all get stoned together!



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Woman sentenced to five to nine years in prison on cocaine, firearm charges

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Audrey Thompson was sentenced on June 24 to five to nine years in prison on drug and firearm charges in Brunswick County Superior Court.

Per District Attorney Jon David’s office, 64-year-old Thompson from Southport was investigated by the sheriff’s office starting in January of 2023.

“For approximately one year, the Sheriff’s Office purchased cocaine from Thompson on multiple occasions. The investigation concluded with a search warrant(s) being executed on her residence and other properties on Trails End Road in Southport N.C. Narcotics officers recovered three stolen firearms from her residence,” the DA’s announcement states.

She pleaded guilty to six counts of sell/deliver cocaine and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon



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Ex-US Marine turned cartel confidant sentenced for smuggling tons of cocaine into the U.S.

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SAN DIEGO (Border Report) — Angel Dominguez Jr., grew up in the border town of Roma, Texas after his family migrated from Jalisco, Mexico when he was 8 years old.

Along the way, he got dual citizenship and joined the Marine Corps after high school.

While stationed in North Carolina in November 1994, he flipped his car and rolled off a bridge into a creek as he tried to avoid a deer on the road.

Dominguez was badly injured, but his two daughters, ages 3 and 4, died in the crash

His injuries were so severe that the Marines gave Dominguez a medical discharge, ending his military career and dream of becoming a member of an elite special forces unit.

After leaving the military, Dominguez struggled to find steady work.

Years later, he was arrested in Texas while trying to cross the border with a load of marijuana. He pleaded guilty and spent 13 months in federal prison.

Upon his release, he went to work for his brother-in-law in the construction industry, but the work dried up as the housing market plummeted.

In 2007, according to his attorney, Dominguez moved to Mexico where he met people who smuggled marijuana and cocaine into the U.S.

Dominguez developed relationships with cartels throughout Mexico and Latin America, had he reportedly used his smarts and large bribes to work with Mexican lawmakers and those in law enforcement.

“He has never made an excuse for the direction he took, only to say that after the accident, he stopped caring. He was numb,” according to defense attorney Nancee Schwartz, who made these comments in a written sentencing document. “He didn’t think or care about consequences because he had experienced the worst.”

Earlier this week, 28 years after the crash, Dominguez now 50, was sentenced to 195 months in prison, according to a news release issued by the Department of Justice.

Prosecutors described him as the “unquestioned leader” of an underworld group called “El Seguimiento 39” also known as “The Company” or “El Seg 39.”

Prosecutors say Dominguez ran a network that transported drugs into the United States and laundered money for several rival drug cartels in Mexico including the Sinaloa Cartel, Cártel de Jalisco Nueva Generación, Los Zetas and others.

“Wiretap evidence demonstrates that he controlled every aspect of his organization,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Kyle Martin wrote in a sentencing memorandum, according to a story published in the San Diego Union-Tribune. “Dominguez did rely on co-conspirators to negotiate and control drug routes, find sources of supply, and prevent law enforcement from thwarting his trafficking, but ultimately he gave the orders to each of these co-conspirators.”

U.S. District Judge William Q. Hayes noted the “staggering” amount of cocaine that Dominguez smuggled.

Dominguez and his group reportedly smuggled, on average, 10 tons of cocaine into the United States per month while laundering at least $10 million of drug proceeds back into Mexico on a monthly basis.

“Today’s sentence sends a message that the leaders of even the most powerful criminal organizations will be held accountable,” said U.S. Attorney Randy Grossman.

But Dominguez’s attorney wrote the claims against his client were never supported by any evidence offered by prosecutors.

Dominguez was arrested in Mexico back in 2016 and extradited to San Diego.

https://wgntv.com/news/ex-marine-turned-cartel-confidant-sentenced-for-smuggling-tons-of-cocaine-into-the-u-s/



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Fourteen People Charged in International Drug Trafficking and Money Laundering Scheme

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NEWS RELEASE SUMMARY – May 30, 2024

SAN DIEGO – A federal grand jury has charged 14 people with participating in an international multi-million-dollar cocaine trafficking and money laundering scheme.

According to an indictment unsealed today, plus additional information in a related search warrant, the alleged leader of the trafficking organization, Jesus Ruiz-Sandoval, managed the smuggling and distribution of large quantities of cocaine from Tijuana into the United States, and the movement of cash proceeds back to Mexico. Ruiz is a United States citizen who fled the U.S. for Mexico several years ago, in violation of his terms of supervised release for a prior federal drug-trafficking crime (Case number 08-cr-00713-DSF in the Central District of California).

The search warrant said Ruiz worked closely with other co-conspirators, including John Joe Soto and Esteban Sinhue Mercado, who are also U.S. citizens currently residing in Mexico. The alleged conspiracy involved smuggling large multi-kilo quantities of cocaine from Tijuana through San Diego to Los Angeles. From there, commercial trucks transported the cocaine from Los Angeles to the Mid-Atlantic for distribution in the Eastern United States. Commercial trucks also transported cash proceeds from the cocaine sales back across the United States to Los Angeles, where it was packaged and loaded into cars that couriers drove through San Diego and into Tijuana, delivering the proceeds to Ruiz there. To date, investigators have seized more than $5 million in cash proceeds and more than 130 kilos of cocaine.

“This office targets sophisticated international trafficking cells by hitting them where it hurts ­— their wallets,” said U.S. Attorney Tara K. McGrath. “Following the money takes you to the heart of a trafficking organization and this prosecution aims to drive a stake through it.” U.S. Attorney McGrath expressed her gratitude to the Los Angeles Police Department and the Hawthorne Police Department, which provided invaluable partnership in this investigation.

“One of the pillars of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) is to identify and dismantle international drug trafficking organizations who poison our communities,” said Christopher Davis, Acting Special Agent in Charge for HSI San Diego. “Throughout this investigation and with the unwavering support from our law enforcement partners, we further discovered their involvement in a money laundering scheme. This indictment serves as a warning to those believing they can remain undetected by HSI – our message is clear. You will be found and you will be brought to justice.”

“This indictment marks a significant milestone in our relentless pursuit of justice against transnational criminal organizations. By leveraging collaborative efforts, CBP alongside our partner agencies are able to target the root causes of crime and dismantle organized criminal enterprises,” said Sidney K. Aki, Director of Field Operations for San Diego Field Office. “Ultimately, this unified approach promotes public safety, reduces the flow of illegal drugs and laundered funds, and strengthens the resilience of communities against these threats.”

This investigation is one of two into Ruiz. Several months after a grand jury in San Diego first indicted Ruiz, a separate grand jury in the Central District of California indicted him and others for a separate, but similar, international trafficking scheme. See United States v. Sandoval et al., 24-CR-008 AB (C.D. Cal.). The prosecutions of Ruiz and others indicted in both cases will proceed in coordinated fashion.

Another defendant, Ricardo Miranda-Beltran (aka Ricardo Miranda-Benitez), appeared Tuesday for his initial appearance on the indictment. Miranda was arrested in the Eastern District of California and ordered detained, and then ordered to appear in San Diego on these charges.

DEFENDANTS                                             Case Number 23cr1574 AJB                                        

*Jose Ruiz-Sandoval                                      Age: 45                                   Mexico

*John Joe Soto                                                Age: 43                                   Mexico

*Esteban Sinhue Mercado                              Age: 24                                   Mexico

Brittany Mangrum                                          Age: 36                                   Van Nuys, CA

Liliana Ruvalcaba-Gonzalez                          Age: 25                                   Anaheim, CA

Yessenia Lazo                                                 Age: 23                                   Los Angeles, CA

Ricardo Miranda-Beltran                               Age: 57                                   Bakersfield, CA

Edwin Rafael Hernandez                                Age: 32                                   Pasadena, CA

*Denotes fugitives who are not in custody

**Additional defendants’ names are redacted and not listed here

SUMMARY OF CHARGES

Conspiracy to Distribute Controlled Substances – Title 21, United States Code, Sections 841(a) & 846

Maximum Penalty: Life in custody, $10 million fine, and a life term of supervised release

Conspiracy to Import Controlled Substances – Title 21, United States Code, Sections 952, 960, and 963

Maximum Penalty: Life in custody, $10 million fine, and a life term of supervised release

Consp. to Launder Monetary Instruments – Title 18, United States Code, Sections 1956(a)(2)(B)(i) & (h)

Maximum Penalty:- Twenty years in custody, $500,000 fine or twice the laundered amount, and a 3-year term of supervised release

Bulk Cash Smuggling – Title 31, United States Code, Section 5332

Maximum Penalty: Five years in custody, $250,000 fine, and a 3-year term of supervised release

AGENCIES

Homeland Security Investigations

Customs and Border Protection

Los Angeles Police Department, Transnational Organized Crime Section

Hawthorne Police Department

*The charges and allegations contained in an indictment or complaint are merely accusations, and the defendants are considered innocent unless and until proven guilty.

This prosecution is part of an Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces (OCDETF) investigation. OCDETF identifies, disrupts, and dismantles the highest-level drug traffickers, money launderers, gangs, and transnational criminal organizations that threaten the United States by using a prosecutor-led, intelligence-driven, multi-agency approach that leverages the strengths of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies against criminal networks



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