Connect with us

Cannabis Law News

Ban on cannabis users owning guns is unconstitutional, U.S. judge rules

Published

on


Before we start we think this report is also relevant from public radio Tulsa published 10 April 2019

The Oklahoma Supreme Court is going to need a new justice.

With Republicans fast-tracking President Trump’s judicial nominees, 38-year-old Oklahoma Supreme Court Justice Patrick Wyrick has been confirmed for the U.S District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma.

The Senate confirmed his nomination along party lines 53–47 late Tuesday, with new rules strictly limiting time for debate over judicial nominees.

…./….

Wyrick has been mentioned as a potential U.S. Supreme Court pick for President Trump.

https://www.publicradiotulsa.org/local-regional/2019-04-10/senate-confirms-oklahoma-supreme-court-justice-patrick-wyrick-for-federal-bench

 

Reuters..

Feb 4 (Reuters) – A federal law prohibiting marijuana users from possessing firearms is unconstitutional, a federal judge in Oklahoma has concluded, citing last year’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling that significantly expanded gun rights.

Read (paywall) 

ABC news provides more detail

OKLAHOMA CITY — A federal judge in Oklahoma has ruled that a federal law prohibiting people who use marijuana from owning firearms is unconstitutional, the latest challenge to firearms regulations after the U.S. Supreme Court’s conservative majority set new standards for reviewing the nation’s gun laws.

Lawyers for Jared Michael Harrison had argued that their client’s Second Amendment right to bear arms was being violated by a federal law that makes it illegal for “unlawful users or addicts of controlled substances” to possess firearms.

Harrison had been charged after being arrested by police in Lawton, Oklahoma, in May 2022 following a traffic stop. During a search of his car, police found a loaded revolver as well as marijuana. Harrison told police he had been on his way to work at a medical marijuana dispensary, but that he did not have a state-issued medical-marijuana card.

His lawyers had argued the portion of federal firearms law focused on drug users or addicts was not consistent with the nation’s historical tradition of firearm regulation, echoing what the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled last year in a case known as New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Bruen. That case set new standards for interpreting the Second Amendment.

Federal prosecutors had argued that the portion of the law focused on drug users is “consistent with a longstanding historical tradition in America of disarming presumptively risky persons, namely, felons, the mentally ill, and the intoxicated.”

Read more at

https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/judge-banning-guns-marijuana-users-unconstitutional-96907061



Source link

Continue Reading

Cannabis Law News

New Mexico Regulation and Licensing Department revokes licenses at two Torrance County cannabis farms

Published

on

By



New Mexico Regulation and Licensing Department revokes licenses at two Torrance County cannabis farms



Source link

Continue Reading

Cannabis Law News

Massachusetts: Uxbridge to refund more than $1 million to cannabis retail outlet in impact fees case

Published

on

By


The Town of Uxbridge has reached an agreement in Superior Court to largely refund the community impact fees paid by a cannabis store, according to court documents and the law firm representing the store

On Dec. 29, the town entered into an agreement with Caroline’s Cannabis to refund the store $1,171,633.60. According to a statement from the law firm MacMillan Law Offices, the amount constitutes 80% of the community impact fees the store paid the town and may be the first legal settlement resulting in refund of the controversial fees in the state.

The store has a location at 640 Douglas St. in Uxbridge.

According to the law firm’s statement, Caroline’s Cannabis filed a lawsuit against the town in Worcester Superior Court in 2022. The store sought an order requiring the town to produce documentation to substantiate the community impact fee it was collecting from the store.

Caroline’s Cannabis claimed it had caused no impact or costs to the town, and that the town could not collect the fees unless it could document otherwise. At the time, Caroline’s Cannabis requested to recover $1.4 million.

Read the background here

https://www.telegram.com/story/news/local/2024/01/18/carolyns-cannabis-community-impact-fees-refuns/72272643007/



Source link

Continue Reading

Cannabis Law News

Beverly Hills Lawyer Invested in Oregon Cannabis Farm .. Percentage of Crop(s) Ended Up In Cali Market

Published

on

By


Willamette Week breaks the story that’s going to ruin his holidays.

One of the many weed entrepreneurs to descend on Cave Junction during the green rush was Matthew Portnoff, a partner with a specialty in cannabis law at the California offices of a white-shoe law firm.

In 2020, the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission determined that weed grown at his farm in 2019 had been diverted onto the black market. But after a yearslong investigation, the agency was never able to conclude whether Portnoff authorized the leakage—or if he was instead the victim of a swindle.

Portnoff declined to comment for this story.

A graduate of UC Berkeley and the University of Southern California’s law school, Portnoff, 48, is an expert in tax law based in Beverly Hills, with a history of entrepreneurial forays. (An online database lists him as a producer of a romantic comedy starring Paris Hilton in 2006 that was panned by critics.)

In 2016, Portnoff and his wife, Luiza, purchased a Cave Junction farm for $415,000 just as the state began handing out licenses to grow recreational weed. (An LLC controlled by his father, a surgeon from California, bought 19 acres next door to his son for the same purpose.)

Two years later, Portnoff and his wife landed a license. So, eventually, did his dad. They grew thousands of plants on the 35-acre properties located along Takilma Road in the rural farmland of the Illinois Valley.

To run his new Oregon farm, Portnoff hired a local grower named Michael Horner, who’d come recommended by a California client.

But by the time the first harvest arrived, an oversupply of weed on the market caused prices in Oregon to fall by at least half.

And beginning in February 2019, the OLCC began documenting a series of concerning reports from Portnoff’s employees.

First, Horner quit his job working for Portnoff and told an OLCC inspector in February 2019 that men had arrived on the farm to take weed back to California for sale.

A month later, the inspector went to the farm to investigate. State-licensed farms are required to have surveillance cameras monitoring all aspects of the operation. But in March 2019, the inspector discovered a four-day gap in the footage—and found “many discrepancies” between the inventory on site and what was recorded in a state database. The inspector opened some storage totes to find them empty or full of “waste material.” (The OLCC declined to disclose the records identifying the discrepancies to WW, noting they were exempt from public disclosure.)

Read the full report at 

https://www.wweek.com/news/2023/12/20/a-beverly-hills-lawyer-invested-in-oregon-weed-not-all-of-the-crop-seems-to-have-stayed-in-oregon/



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending

Copyright © 2021 The Art of MaryJane Media