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Menthol Cigarette Ban Could Save Lives in the Black Community

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A study simulating the public health impact of a US menthol cigarette ban reveals significant potential benefits for the non-Hispanic black population. Implementing the ban could lead to a substantial decrease in smoking rates, resulting in approximately 255,895 premature deaths averted and 4.0 million life years gained over a 40-year period.

The US FDA‘s (Food and Drug Administration) proposal to ban menthol cigarettes has sparked a critical analysis of its potential public health effects, especially among the non-Hispanic black (NHB) population, who have higher rates of menthol cigarette use. A simulation study applied the Menthol Smoking and Vaping Model to the NHB population, comparing a status quo scenario with a menthol ban scenario from 2021 to 2060.

The findings suggest that the ban could lead to a 35.7% reduction in overall smoking by 2026 and a 25.3% reduction by 2060, compared to the status quo. This reduction in smoking rates is projected to avert approximately 255,895 premature deaths and gain 4.0 million life years over the 40-year period, highlighting the ban’s potential to significantly reduce smoking-associated health impacts and disparities within the NHB population.

Why It Matters: The study underscores the importance of implementing a menthol cigarette ban to address health disparities and improve public health outcomes, particularly among the non-Hispanic black population. By significantly reducing smoking rates, the ban could lead to considerable health gains and contribute to narrowing the health disparity gap.

Potential Implications: The findings support the FDA’s proposal for a menthol cigarette ban, suggesting it could be a crucial step toward reducing health disparities and improving public health. This study may influence policy decisions and encourage further research on the impact of tobacco product regulation on different population groups.

Source: NY Times

More stats: Current smoking has declined from 20.9% (nearly 21 of every 100 adults) in 2005 to 11.5% (nearly 12 of every 100 adults) in 2021. More data is the “Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults in the United States” report by the CDC.



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Castle Pines sued by landowner for stopping city’s first McDonald’s

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“No clown in our town!” residents chanted as they hoisted homemade protest signs that read, “No McDonald’s double drive-thru fast food dispensary on Castle Pines Parkway.”

It was May 28 in the bedroom community of Castle Pines, where the City Council was weighing whether to allow construction of the town’s first McDonald’s. About 100 people attended and two dozen testified. Most in the crowd and on the council were opposed.

“Garbage fast food that attracts low-income, high-yield traffic from a very busy highway isn’t what I want,” a woman testified. Another warned, “Your average McDonald’s transient customer — which means half are below average — isn’t the element we should be promoting.”

Read the rest of this story on TheKnow.DenverPost.com.



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Kroger-Albertsons merger could lead to sale of 91 stores across Colorado

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Kroger and Albertsons would unload 91 grocery stores in Colorado if the companies prevail over lawsuits and regulators’ opposition to a merger of the two large supermarket chains.

The stores on the list of ones that would be sold to C&S Wholesale Grocers are spread across the state, ranging from Alamosa and Cortez to Fraser and Frisco with several in metro Denver. Two Albertsons stores are on the list of those to be sold. The rest are Safeways. That’s the bulk of the 105 Albertsons and Safeways in the state.

A dairy plant, an entire distribution center and part of another one in Denver would also be part of the deal with C&S Wholesale grocers.

Read the rest of this story on TheKnow.DenverPost.com.



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These Denver neighborhoods have attracted cannabis businesses in a big way, but not much else

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Roger Cobb has spent his life in Denver, bouncing around different neighborhoods before coming to settle in Northeast Park Hill. When he rides his new motorcycle — named Purple Rain — around the city, he notices how community resources are distributed.

“If you cross (Quebec Street), there’s about six, seven, eight different pools over there,” Cobb said last week at the Northeast Park Hill Coalition’s June membership meeting. “We have, really, two.”

Celeste Leonard, 14, drops into the deep end of the pool from the slide at the Hiawatha Davis Jr. Recreation Center in Denver Friday, June 21, 2024. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post)

Read the rest of this story on DenverPost.com.



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