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Surprise, Missouri! State opens adult-use marijuana sales three days early

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Missouri officially joined the adult-use club early this morning, as state officials gave the green light to recreational sales three days ahead of schedule.

This marks the fastest vote-to-sale time in legal cannabis history. Missouri voters approved adult-use legalization on the Nov. 8, 2022, ballot. Less than three months later, local residents lined up to sample the goods.

Sales were expected to begin on Monday, Feb. 6, but yesterday afternoon state regulatory officials said they would allow adult-use sales to start on Friday morning at 196 operating medical marijuana dispensaries.

That caused some confusion, as it remained unclear whether all stores would be ready to serve non-medical customers over the weekend.

A number of stores were vying for “first sale” bragging rights. The Good Day Farm store in Independence recorded its first sale (photo above) at 8:12 a.m.

Leafly will continue to follow today’s opening as it rolls on across the state.

Congratulations, Missouri!





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cannabis control commission

Who are you calling rudderless? Massachusetts cannabis regulator defends work on $7B industry

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The agency regulating the marijuana industry is not “rudderless,” according to its acting chairwoman, and continues to work despite assertions that it needs a receiver in order to function.

“If you paid attention, we’re working. It’s always all hands on deck. We’re continuing to push policies,” Cannabis Control Commission Acting Chair Ava Callender Concepcion told the Herald in a one-on-one interview.

The legal marijuana industry in Massachusetts made $7 billion in sales last year, and $1 billion of that came back to the Bay State in the form of taxes and fees.

Read the rest of this story on BostonHerald.com.



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Donald Trump

Supreme Court makes it harder to charge Jan. 6 defendants – and Trump – with obstruction

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By MARK SHERMAN

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Friday made it harder to charge Capitol riot defendants with obstruction, a charge that also has been brought against former President Donald Trump.

The justices ruled that the charge of obstructing an official proceeding, enacted in 2002 in response to the financial scandal that brought down Enron Corp., must include proof that defendants tried to tamper with or destroy documents. Only some of the people who violently attacked the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, fall into that category.

Read the rest of this story on TheKnow.DenverPost.com.



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entertainment

Supreme Court weakens power of federal regulators by overturning Chevron decision, target of conservatives and business

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WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Friday upended a 40-year-old decision that made it easier for the federal government to regulate the environment, public health, workplace safety and consumer protections, delivering a far-reaching and potentially lucrative victory to business interests.

The court’s six conservative justices overturned the 1984 decision colloquially known as Chevron, long a target of conservatives. The liberal justices were in dissent.

Billions of dollars are potentially at stake in challenges that could be spawned by the high court’s ruling. The Biden administration’s top Supreme Court lawyer had warned such a move would be an “unwarranted shock to the legal system.”

Read the rest of this story on TheKnow.DenverPost.com.



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